Bushonomics a Threat?


Apparently that bastion of Librul traitors, the International Monetary Fund, isn’t too thrilled about BushCo’s economic policies. In fact, they seem to think we’re a threat to the whole global economy:

With its rising budget deficit and ballooning trade imbalance, the United States is running up a foreign debt of such record-breaking proportions that it threatens the financial stability of the global economy, according to a report released Wednesday by the International Monetary Fund.Prepared by a team of I.M.F. economists, the report sounded a loud alarm about the shaky fiscal foundation of the United States, questioning the wisdom of the Bush administration’s tax cuts and warning that large budget deficits pose “significant risks” not just for the United States but for the rest of the world.

The report warns that the United States’ net financial obligations to the rest of the world could be equal to 40 percent of its total economy within a few years — “an unprecedented level of external debt for a large industrial country,” according to the fund, that could play havoc with the value of the dollar and international exchange rates.

The danger, according to the report, is that the United States’ voracious appetite for borrowing could push up global interest rates and thus slow global investment and economic growth.

(via Sherman’s Blog)

Sherman also reports that NY Sen Charles Schumer is explaining the “jobless recovery” very simply: the new jobs are going offshore.

We are concerned that the United States may be entering a new economic era in which American workers will face direct global competition at almost every job level — from the machinist to the software engineer to the Wall Street analyst. Any worker whose job does not require daily face-to-face interaction is now in jeopardy of being replaced by a lower-paid, equally skilled worker thousands of miles away. American jobs are being lost not to competition from foreign companies, but to multinational corporations, often with American roots, that are cutting costs by shifting operations to low-wage countries.To call this a “jobless recovery” is inaccurate: lots of new jobs are being created, just not here in the United States.

That would explain it.

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